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Commentary from a long term NetWorker consultant and Backup Theorist

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Last month’s top story

Posted by Preston on 2009-08-01

I thought that I might from now on try to do a brief comment at the start of each month on what the most popular story of the previous month was.

There is one caveat – as I aluded to in the previous “Top 5” post, I have some posts that get hit an awful lot of times. So, the absolute most-referenced posts, being “Fixing NSR peer information”, “Parallelism in NetWorker” and “Changing saveset browse/retention time” are effectively disqualified for making it into consideration for a “Last month’s top story”.

For this inuagural entry, we have “Carry a jukebox with you (if you’re using Linux)“. Outside of the above 3 articles, this one was viewed the most – and, for what it’s worth, generated a lot of follow-through clicks going through to Mark Harvey’s linuxvtl web page.While not a production VTL, Mark’s Linux VTL software has already given me a great deal of efficiencies over this last month in my lab environment. I have versions of NetWorker on lab servers all with the VTL configured, making testing of a wide variety of options considerably easier than having physical tape libraries connected and powered on. I hope others are finding it similarly useful. One of the comments to the article was someone asking about a more complete set of instructions for getting the VTL up and running – I aim to have this done by the end of this weekend.

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