NetWorker Blog

Commentary from a long term NetWorker consultant and Backup Theorist

  • This blog has moved!

    This blog has now moved to nsrd.info/blog. Please jump across to the new site for the latest articles (and all old archived articles).
  •  


     


     

  • Enterprise Systems Backup and Recovery

    If you find this blog interesting, and either have an interest in or work in data protection/backup and recovery environments, you should check out my book, Enterprise Systems Backup and Recovery: A Corporate Insurance Policy. Designed for system administrators and managers alike, it focuses on features, policies, procedures and the human element to ensuring that your company has a suitable and working backup system rather than just a bunch of copies made by unrelated software, hardware and processes.
  • This blog has moved!

    This blog has now moved to nsrd.info/blog. Please jump across to the new site for the latest articles (and all old archived articles).
  •  


     


     

  • Twitter

    Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.

Most popular in August

Posted by Preston on 2009-09-01

The most visited post in August was again, Carry a jukebox with you (if you’re using Linux). I think part of this must be attributed to the linkage of Linux with Free. I.e., because Linux is seen as low cost (or no cost), there’s a core group, particularly of open source fans, who want to come up with a totally free solution for their environment, no matter what environment that is.

However, I don’t think that’s all that can be attributed to why this article keep on drawing people in. Despite my reservations about VTL, a lot of people are interested in deploying them. It’s important to stress again – I don’t dislike VTLs, I just wish we didn’t need them. Recognising though that we do need them, I can appreciate the management benefits that they bring to an environment.

From a support perspective of course I’m a big fan – with a VTL I can carry a jukebox around wherever I go.

The Linux VTL post even beat out old standards – the parallelism and NSR peer information related posts, which normally win hands down every month.

(From a policy and procedural perspective though, it was good to see that the introductory post to zero error policies, What is a Zero Error Policy?, got the next most attention. I can’t really stress enough how important I think zero error policies are to systems management in general, and backup/data protection specifically.)

Advertisements

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

 
%d bloggers like this: