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The 7 procedural obligations of backup administrators

Posted by Preston on 2009-09-16

Hi!

Please read this article over at the NetWorker Information Hub, “The 7 procedural obligations of backup administrators“.

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10 Responses to “The 7 procedural obligations of backup administrators”

  1. […] The NetWorker Blog has a great article discussing the 7 Procedural Obligations of a Backup Administrator. […]

  2. I’m sorry, but I don’t understand what “To be across ongoing capacity management and forecasting requirements”. I understand (and agree with) the explanation that follows, but I can’t parse the original sentence. What am I missing?

    • Preston said

      What I’m referring to is the need to have an understanding of both the current capacity forecasts and what sort of growth factors lead into them. This allows a better reaction to changing circumstances. E.g., if you ask the average backup admin, they’ll probably say that yearly data growth is X% – let’s say for the example, 30%. But where does that 30% come from? Is 70% of that from filesystem data growth, 20% from database growth, with a remaining 10% to handle miscellaneous. Having an idea of the breakdown of the growth areas allows a better understanding of the impact of growth spikes – e.g., when other departments are added to the backup environment, or new projects start up that require additional storage.

      It also ties in with the budget and purchase cycles, both for CapEx and OpEx for the company. I.e., you need to be across the capacity management such that you can slot in CapEx requests and make OpEx expenditure in a planned, logical way that fits into the fiscal operations of the company. Of course, there’s always the chance to have exceptions, but the goal should be to keep the process as smooth and straight forward as possible.

  3. […] The NetWorker Blog has a great article discussing the 7 Procedural Obligations of a Backup Administrator. […]

  4. […] my definition of recoverable in The 7 Procedural Obligations of Backup Administrators, I’d like to suggest that for most situations, there’s no such thing as a trickle […]

  5. […] by Preston Looking back over September, the most read/visited article was “The 7 Procedural Obligations of Backup Administrators“. The goal of the article was to outline what functions should be at the absolute core of any […]

  6. […] The NetWorker Blog has a great article discussing the 7 Procedural Obligations of a Backup Administrator. […]

  7. […] by Preston You might think, given that I wrote an article awhile ago about the Procedural Obligations of Backup Administrators that it wouldn’t be necessary to explicitly spell out any recovery rules – but this […]

  8. ced said

    Hi,

    I’ve had an intense discussion with my management today about the responsabilities of my job (being responsible for the backup service)

    Do yo consider that a restore test is a task to be perfomed/initiated by a backup administrator or to be initiated by an application owner.

    My point of view was that restoring data alone is meaningless. This is not the goal of a restore and as a backup admin, i can’t do more. Only the application owner is able to restore all elements of its application and ensure that the system is restorable from the backup.

    What do you think ?

    I ask you the same question when specific modules have been deployed to ensure the consistency like NMM for MOSS. Who is responsible of performing the restore/consistency check ? The backup admin or the moss admin ?

  9. Preston said

    I agree with your take, and would suggest that it’s irresponsible of either management or other administrators (application, database, system) who don’t get involved in recovery testing.

    The job of a backup administrator should be to facilitate the backup and recovery process, of course, but that role should be one which ensures that the resources and configuration are correct so as to enable the sys/app/db administrators to perform their role.

    As I suggest in my book, everyone in a company has a role to play in backup and recovery. While there is a certain amount of familiarity that should be expected of backup administrators with all the backup/recovery operations, the core aspects should be tested and (where possible) handled by the people with the primary responsibility in these areas.

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