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Commentary from a long term NetWorker consultant and Backup Theorist

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NetWorker and Snow Leopard, Redux

Posted by Preston on 2009-09-18

When Snow Leopard first came out, I was reasonably impressed with how easily NetWorker continued to operate with it – and for desktop users and administrators of fixed-location servers, that should remain the case.

For laptop users though, it’s turning out to be slightly different story. My ongoing experience now is that if I switch locations repeatedly (e.g., home to work, work to customer site, customer site to work), the NetWorker client daemons eventually get so bogged down that it’s necessary to reboot to get back to working backups. In fact, a couple of times I’ve needed to go so far as to reinstall NetWorker on my laptop in order to get it running again smoothly. (That’s using NetWorker 7.5.1.)

If you’ve got mobile users upgraded to Snow Leopard who are now experiencing backup problems, a reboot (unfortunately) may be your first point of call – the nature of the daemon hang-up seems to prevent proper process shutdown, which in turn prevents the daemons from properly restarting. If the reboot fails, a client reinstall should fix it.

From my experience so far, it seems to only happen when locations are changed multiple times.

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